Here’s How The Ford Ranger Raptor’s Fox Shocks Make It A Great Off-Roader

The Ford Ranger Raptor has been forbidden fruit for customers in the United States since its debut in 2018. But no longer. The Blue Oval is fixing this oversight for the 2024 Ranger Raptor by bringing it to the US in the first quarter of 2024. The company is already taking orders for the rugged model, and the automaker has released new details about the truck’s Fox 2.5-inch Live Valve Internal Bypass shocks.

These pieces have a coil-over arrangement in front and piggyback reservoirs at the rear, which Ford says reduces heat build-up. The system has a dedicated computer control unit that allows for adjustable response depending on whether the truck is in Normal, Tow/Haul, Sport, Slippery, Off-Road, Rock Crawl, or Baja driving modes. Sensors monitor each wheel and change the setup according to the condition.

The shock’s internal bypass function provides multiple damping zones as it compresses and rebounds. The video above shows how they work in detail. Openings in the cylinder control the fluid inside. As the piston reaches the upper and lower extremes, more drag is placed onto it, helping prevent the dampers from bottoming or topping out.

Beyond the dampers, the new Ranger Raptor also has a Watts linkage and trailing arms on the rear end, preventing the axle from moving left to right.

The truck’s chassis receives additional reinforcements, including for the front frame rails, front shock towers, rear shock brackets, and suspension mounting points. These upgrades should make the Raptor stiffer so it doesn’t flex as much while off-roading on rugged terrain.

The Ranger Raptor dumps the previous-gen’s turbodiesel four-cylinder for a 3.0-liter twin-turbo V6 that makes 405 horsepower and 430 pound-feet of torque, paired to a 10-speed automatic. The drivetrain includes an electronically controlled on-demand two-speed transfer case and locking differentials for each axle.

To ensure this tech transfers the power to the ground, the truck comes with a set of 33-inch BFGoodrich all-terrain K03 tires. They mount to 17-inch wheels with optional beadlocks, yours for $1595. 

All of this tech should make the Raptor very off-road capable, but if the driver needs extra help, there’s also a system called Trail Control. It controls the throttle and brakes while the person behind the wheel just needs to steer. Plus, skid plates protect the engine, transfer case, and fuel tank in case of jagged rock bashes.

What will putting this mid-sized muscle truck in your garage cost? Pricing starts at $56,960 after the $1,595 destination fee.

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